Last edited by Milmaran
Monday, August 17, 2020 | History

5 edition of religion of Socrates found in the catalog.

religion of Socrates

by Mark L. McPherran

  • 18 Want to read
  • 6 Currently reading

Published by Pennsylvania State University Press in University Park, Pa .
Written in English

    Places:
  • Greece
    • Subjects:
    • Socrates -- Religion.,
    • Greece -- Religion.

    • Edition Notes

      Includes bibliographical references (p. [303]-322) and indexes.

      StatementMark L. McPherran.
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsB318.R45 M38 1996
      The Physical Object
      Paginationxii, 353 p. ;
      Number of Pages353
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL808319M
      ISBN 100271015810
      LC Control Number95045059

      This study argues that to understand Socrates we must uncover and analyze his religious views, since his philosophical and religious views are part of one seamless whole. Mark McPherran provides a close analysis of the relevant Socratic texts, an analysis that yields a comprehensive and original account of Socrates' commitments to religion.   The religious views of Socrates, Plato, and Aristotle form the genesis of monotheistic religious thought. They each form ideas that differ from the traditional view of a polytheistic religion where the gods each have their own personalities and judgments.

      Socrates - Adeimantus Adeimantus thought that the enquiry would be of great service to us. Then, I said, my dear friend, the task must not be given up, even if somewhat long.   Free kindle book and epub digitized and proofread by Project Gutenberg.

      Plato’s Apology of Socrates: Philosophy, Religion, and the Gods in the Origins of Liberal Education Roger Barrus Hampden-Sydney College Liberal education is that form education appropriate for a free human being, who is both an individual with his own ends, and a citizen with purposes and responsibilities relating to the society to which he. 1 Socrates and Plato 17 Time Line for Socrates BC Is born in Athens, Greece, the son of Sophroniscus, a stonemason, and Phaenarete, a midwife. – Grows up during the “golden age” of Greece—his father, an intimate friend of the son of Aristides the Just, provides Socrates an acquaintanceship with the members of the Pericles circle.


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Religion of Socrates by Mark L. McPherran Download PDF EPUB FB2

“This book is by far the most comprehensive and searching study of Socrates's religious commitments and their impact on his philosophy.

McPherran painstakingly sorts through the testimonies of the relevant ancient sources and provides important and often controversial new interpretations of them.”.Cited by: However, Socrates was just as much a sensitive critic and rational reformer of both the religious tradition he inherited and the new cultic incursions he encountered.

McPherran contends that Socrates saw his religious commitments as integral to his philosophical mission of moral examination and, in turn, /5(2). —John Dillion, Trinity College Dublin “This well-produced book is the fullest and in some ways the best discussion of its topic available.” — International Studies in Philosophy “This book is by far the most comprehensive and searching study of Socrates's religious commitments and religion of Socrates book impact on his : Penn State University Press.

But Socrates did not just follow along in the Greek religious tradition; Socrates "was also a sensitive critic and rational reformer of both the religious tradition he inherited and the new theological and cultic incursions he encountered as they swept through fifth-century Athens.".

McPherran discusses in Reviews: 1. Mark McPherran provides a close analysis of the relevant Socratic texts, an analysis that yields a comprehensive and original account of Socrates' commitments to religion. "McPherran's book is the best full-length study of Socratic religion currently available in English.

It is well written and well argued. It should be read by any serious student of Socratic philosophy or the religion of fifth-century Athens."-Hugh H. Benson, University of Oklahoma "This book is by far the most comprehensive and searching study of Socrates's religious commitments and.

As a result, Socrates made important contributions to the rational reformation of Greek religion, contributions that incited and informed the theology of his brilliant pupil, Plato.

Mark L. McPherran is Professor of Philosophy at the University of Maine at Farmington. Socrates and Christ: A Study in the Philosophy of Religion by Robert Mark Wenley ().

The main body of this book first published in by William Blackwood. It stands to reason that he should be part of this book: He played a major role in the Smith-Woodruff volume, and his own The Religion of Socrates (Pennsylvania State University Press, ) argued at length for the compatibility between Socrates' piety and his philosophical enterprise.

The best books on Socrates 1 Apology by Plato. 2 The Clouds by Aristophanes. 3 Theaetetus by Plato. 4 Socrates: Ironist and Moral Philosopher by Gregory Vlastos. 5 The Art of Living by Alexander Nehamas. The religion of Socrates. [Mark L McPherran] -- This study argues that to understand Socrates we must uncover and analyze his religious views, since his philosophical and religious views are part of one seamless whole.

Some controversy also exists about Socrates's attitude towards homosexuality and as to whether or not he believed in the Olympian gods, was monotheistic, or held some other religious viewpoint.

However, it is still commonly taught and held with little exception that Socrates is the progenitor of subsequent Western philosophy, to the point that philosophers before him are Born: c.

BC, Deme Alopece, Athens. Socrates didn't really have a religion. It would appear by platonic scripture, if you will, and also other sources of Ancient Greece, that Homer’s The Illiad and The Odyssey were viewed as scripture of sorts, but there was also folk myths and other schools of thought that followed people like Seneca and Epicurus for example.

Although he never outright rejected the standard Athenian view of religion, Socrates' beliefs were nonconformist. He often referred to God rather than the gods, and reported being guided by an. This book teaches the great religions’ similarities. It teaches a way of life that is taught by the Holy Bible, the Noble Qur'an, and the sacred scriptures of Buddhism and other religions which leads to happiness and success in life.5/5(1).

Socrates’ Death •In BC, when Socrates was 70 years old, he was brought to trial on the charge of impiety, convicted by an Athenian jury consisting of jurors and sentenced to death.

•Socrates refused to escape from prison, even though he was given the opportunity to do so. •Socrates died in prison one month after his trial by.

In Plato’s account, Socrates’ questioning was unsettling to authorities in Athens, who thought that he was undermining the civic religion of Athens and corrupting the youth.

Socrates was thus brought to court, where he was found guilty and sentenced to death. Socrates’ thus became a celebrated martyr for philosophy.

Socrates was an ancient Greek philosopher, one of the three greatest figures of the ancient period of Western philosophy (the others were Plato and Aristotle), who lived in Athens in the 5th century BCE.A legendary figure even in his own time, he was admired by his followers for his integrity, his self-mastery, his profound philosophical insight, and his great argumentative skill.

Though he claims no expertise in religion, Socrates feels uncomfortable with a view of the gods as fighting among themselves and acting immorally. Socrates asks Euthyphro to define the virtue of piety. It is what the gods love, replies Euthyphro.

But Socrates reminds him that his gods quarrel among themselves, so they may disagree on such things. The trial of Socrates ( BC) was held to determine the philosopher’s guilt of two charges: asebeia (impiety) against the pantheon of Athens, and corruption of the youth of the city-state; the accusers cited two impious acts by Socrates: "failing to acknowledge the gods that the city acknowledges" and "introducing new deities".

The death sentence of Socrates was the legal. 2. Socrates and religious beliefs Introduction In Phaedo, Socrates makes a number of claims regarding the existence and nature of the afterlife, and the immortality and reincarnation of the soul that can be compared and contrasted with other religious beliefs.

I will be contrasting and comparing Socrates beliefs with those that practice Judaism. "The book can be read as a work of literary analysis, theology, or philosophy of religion As readers we are invited to reflect 'upon our own thinking and living in light of the values and commitments we discover in these characters'."—Joseph Farry, Perspectives on Political Science.

Socrates's death in BCE has figured largely in our world ever since, shaping how we think about heroism and celebrity, religion and family life, state control and individual freedom, the distance of intellectual life from daily activity -- many of the key coordinates of Western culture.

In this book, Emily Wilson analyzes the enormous and enduring power the trial and death of Socrates .